Skip to content

Nintendo 64 Console

The Nintendo 64 officially abbreviated as N64 is a home video game console developed and marketed by Nintendo. Named for its 64-bit central processing unit, it was released in June 1996 in Japan, September 1996 in North America, and March 1997 in Europe and Australia. It was the last major home console to use the ROM cartridge as its primary storage format until the Switch in 2017. The Nintendo 64 was discontinued in 2002 following the launch of its successor, the GameCube, in 2001.

  • CPU: 64-bit NEC VR4300 (MIPS R4300i) with 24 KB L1 cache, running at 93.75 MHz.
  • Performance: 125 MIPS (million instructions per second), 93.75 MFLOPS (million floating-point operations per second).[1]
  • GPU: 64-bit Reality Coprocessor, running at 62.5 MHz and over 100 MFLOPS.[2] It is a microcode-re programmable T&L GPU,[3] composed of two integrated processors: the Reality Signal Processor (RSP) and the Reality Display Processor (RDP).[4]
  • Video Interface (VI) reads data from the frame buffer using a fixed time interval, and sends it to the DA (digital-to-analogue) converter (video DAC) to produce the video output.
  • Audio Interface (AI) reads data from the audio buffer using a fixed time interval, and sends it to the DA (digital-to-analogue) converter (audio DAC) to produce the sound output.
  • Parallel Interface (PI).
  • Serial Interface (SI).
  • RDRAM Interface (RI).
  • Hardware features: texture mapping with perspective correction,[5] anti-aliasing,[4] Z-buffering,[2] bi-linear filtering,[6] trilinear filtering,[5] Gouraud shading, 8-bit alpha blending, level of detail management.[2]
  • Peak fillrate (by RDP pipeline configuration, or mode):
  • 31.25 megapixels/second (texturing, perspective correction, bi-linear filtering, translucency, Z-buffering, mipmapping, fog; denoted two-instruction mode).
  • 62.5 MP/s (texturing, perspective correction, bi-linear filtering, translucency, Z-buffering; denoted one-instruction mode).
  • 125–250 MP/s (fill mode, copy mode).[6]
  • Audio: 16-bit, stereo, CD quality.[2]
  • Number of ADPCM voices: 16–24 channels with pitch-shifting PCM, up to 100 PCM channels theoretically possible.[2]
  • Sampling frequency: 44.1 kHz or 48 kHz, selectable.
  • 4 (4.5) MB 250 MHz (500 MHz effective) RDRAM (Rambus DRAM)[7] on a shared 9-bit bus with 562.5 MB/s peak bandwidth, upgradable to 8 (9) MB with Expansion Pak. Differing memory countings are due to the 9th bit only being available to the RCP for tasks such as anti-aliasing or Z-buffering.
  • ROM cartridge (Nintendo 64 Game Pak) bus running at 264 MB/s.
  • Resolution: 240p (320×240), 288p (384×288), 480i (640×480), 576i (720×576), widescreen via letterboxing or anamorphic compression.
  • Color palette: 16,777,216 (24-bit color depth), 2,097,152 possible colors (21-bit color) on screen.[2]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: